In vs At - English Grammar - Teaching Tips

 

"In this video, we focus on the difference between in and at when used to talk about a location. As a preposition of place, 'in' is usually used to talk about the position of someone or something inside large places such as countries, continents, big cities and similar. For example: She grew up in Europe. 'At', as a preposition of place, is usually used to refer the position of someone or something inside small and unimportant places such as villages or small towns. For example: I'll meet you at the theater. On top of that, ?at? is also commonly used with proper names such as building names or organizations. For example:- We met at McDonald?s. He works at the bank. So remember: Use 'in' when speaking about the position of someone or something inside large places and ?at? for the position of someone or something inside small and unimportant places, as well as proper names. That's it for today. See you next time!"


Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next.

in this unit we see that there are four ways of evaluating student performance which are placement,practice,progress and diagnostic test. They are all conducted in a different way but diagnostic and placement have related content. we also look into international English boards that test english proficiency like IELTS,TOEFL and some Cambridge assessment english exams.this unit was about pronunciation and phonology. phonology is the study of science analysis and classification of the physical properties of sounds. the unit was somewhat poitless in the sense of having pictures on how to say a word or sound with our mouth.phonemic symbols were kind of distracting and dont see using it in a classroom with non native english speakers.


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