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Unit 4 is about Present Tenses and some activities we can use to teach Present Tenses in our class. Present Tenses include the simple present tense, present continuous tense, Present perfect tense, and Present perfect continuous tense. + Present perfect continuous tense. The simple present tense is used to talk about our habits and general truths. It is formed with the base form of the infinitive. Form: Subject + first form of the verb + object • Susan writes stories. • Cows eat grass. • She drives to work. Questions and negatives are made with do and does. • She does not work. • Where does she work? • I do not like bananas. • Do you like chocolates? + Present continuous tense The present continuous tense is used to talk about things that are happening at the moment of speaking. Form: Subject + is / am / are + -ing form • I am writing. • The birds are singing. • The wind is blowing. • It is raining. Questions are made by putting the auxiliary verb before the subject. • Are the birds singing? • Is she coming? + Present perfect tense The present perfect tense is used to talk about past events that have some bearing on the present. Form: Subject + has / have + past participle form of the verb • I have visited Australia. • She has finished that report. • They have accepted the invitation. Questions are made by putting the auxiliary verb before the subject. • Have you visited Australia? • Has she finished that report? • Have they accepted the invitation? + Present perfect continuous tense The present perfect continuous tense is used to talk about events and situations that started in the past and have continued up to the present. It is commonly used with the time expressions since and for. • I have been working on this report since morning. • It has been raining for two hours. • We have been living in this city for twenty years. Questions are made by putting has or have before the subject. • Have you been working on this report since morning? • Has it been raining for two hours?